Middle East & North Africa

5 Items

President Ronald Reagan addresses the Center for Strategic International Studies

AP/Charles Tasnadi

Journal Article - Texas National Security Review

When Do Leaders Change Course? Theories of Success and the American Withdrawal from Beirut, 1983–1984

Why did the United States withdraw from Lebanon in February 1984? How did new information shape policymakers' proposals to expand, maintain, or terminate the intervention? Drawing upon declassified records, the authors challenge the conventional narrative that the October 1983 barracks bombing precipitated the American withdrawal from Beirut.

Memorial to Iranian Murdered scientists of Iran's Nuclear program.

Wikimedia CC

Magazine Article - TLS (Times Literary Supplement)

Take Out the Driver

| June 05, 2018

Calder Walton reviews Rise and Kill First by Ronen Bergman. He writes that the book not only sheds light on Israel's intelligence services, but also has wider significance: how and why a state uses extra-judicial killing—and the consequences of doing so.

Dover House, Whitehall

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Haaretz

Coat Bomb and Explosive Prosthesis: British Intel Files Reveal How the Zionist Stern Gang Terrorized London

| Dec. 02, 2017

"MI5's dossiers on Stern Gang members released this week cast the early years of the Cold War in a stark new light — terrorism, not the Soviet Union, was the main threat. The newly released files also have an enduring legacy. Many of the security techniques British intelligence developed to deal with the Irgun and Stern Gang — surveillance of extremist groups, border and port checks, liaison with foreign police agencies — were the same counterterrorist procedures later used against the IRA and current Islamist terror groups."

Al Haig, former Secretary of State, speaks to the press about President Ronald Reagan's condition after being shot on March 30, 1981.

Reagan Presidential Library

Analysis & Opinions - War on the Rocks

Crisis in Foggy Bottom: What Rex Tillerson Can Really Learn From Alexander Haig

| Nov. 21, 2017

The authors offer a detailed analysis of the factors that led to Alexander Haig's resignation as U.S. Secretary of State in 1982 in order to enrich scholars' and policymakers' understanding of the political and strategic consequences of a chief diplomat being maligned and marginalized.