Middle East & North Africa

2121 Items

Fans react as they watch the “Greatest Royal Rumble” event in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Friday, April 27, 2018. A previous WWE event held in 2014 was for men only, but Friday night’s event included both women and children in attendance. AP Photo/Amr Nabil

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Profile of a Prince: Promise and Peril in Mohammed bin Salman’s Vision 2030

| April 2019

This report, based on three prolonged trips to the Kingdom over the past year, the most recent in January 2019, will take a deep look at Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who dominates every aspect of foreign and domestic policy, to try to answer what lies behind his Mona Lisa smile. It will also examine the Kingdom’s social progress, its economic stagnation and its growing political repression. Readers will have to evaluate for themselves whether the social progress he has offered Saudis in general—and women in particular—offset his autocratic tactics at home and abroad.

Joseph Nye

Sabancı University

Announcement - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Joseph Nye Honored with Jury Prize at the Sakıp Sabancı International Research Awards Ceremony

| Apr. 17, 2019

Professor Joseph S. Nye, Jr. received the Sakıp Sabancı International Research Awards' Jury Prize at a ceremony held at Istanbul's  Sabancı Center on April 10, 2019. The ceremony was hosted by the Sakıp Sabancı family and  Sabancı University.

 President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn

AP/Andrew Harnik, File

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The United States Will Be Shocked by Its Future

| Apr. 16, 2019

Stephen Walt writes that the number of problems Americans need to address is growing and at an increasingly rapid rate. Issues such as climate change, refugees, changing labor markets, soaring deficits, violent extremists, privacy, shifting balances of power, etc. may outstrip the country's capacity to formulate workable solutions. Addressing such problems  successfully will require paying less attention to conditions abroad and more attention to domestic institutions.

Members of the Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards attend a rally against the U.S.'s decision to designate the guard as a foreign terrorist organization

AP/Vahid Salemi

Analysis & Opinions - Lawfare

The U.S. Names the Iranian Revolutionary Guard a Terrorist Organization and Sanctions the International Criminal Court

| Apr. 10, 2019

Elena Chachko analyzes the legal implications of two unprecedented actions by the Trump administration: designating an entire component of a foreign government as an Foreign Terrorist Organization and imposing individual sanctions on a senior international civil servant for acting in her capacity as an organ of an international institution. 

 

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Analysis & Opinions - METRO U.N.

Golan Heights

| Apr. 03, 2019

For Europeans and the international community, including the US until the Trump Administration, the Golan Heights represented the classical case of a frozen conflict where military action had come to an end but where no political agreement, let alone a peace treaty, had provided a mutually accepted solution among the conflict parties.

Windfall, by Meghan O'Sullivan

Simon & Schuster

Analysis & Opinions - LinkedIn

Energy Abundance and the Environment: An Interview with Meghan L. O’Sullivan, Part 2

    Author:
  • Scott Nyquist
| Apr. 03, 2019

The subtitle tells the story. In the early 2000s, many pundits and politicians talked up “peak oil”, “energy scarcity,” and all that. In a geological heartbeat later—about a decade—the world had entered an era of “energy abundance,” largely due to innovations that allowed producers to crack into shale formations to release massive new sources of oil and gas. The United States has gone furthest and fastest in fracking and is setting records for oil and gas production. For the US, says O’Sullivan, this has been an economic, strategic, and environmental game-changer. For the rest of the world, the effects are more differentiated but hardly less profound.

Vice President Mike Pence, left, and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, right, watch as President Donald Trump shows off an executive order

AP/Evan Vucci, File

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

5 Very Important Things About the World Nobody Knows

| Apr. 02, 2019

Stephen Walt writes that the future will be determined by a handful of big questions: What is China's future trajectory; How good are America's cybercapabilities; What's going to happen to the EU; How many states will go nuclear in the next 20 years; and Who will win the debate on U.S. grand strategy?

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Immigrants Help Keep Americans Safe

| Apr. 01, 2019

By and large, only immigrants can deliver true native language ability and deep cultural understanding. Those with such skills have been in high demand in recent decades. Many have left normal American lives to answer the call. They often have deployed to the world’s most dangerous war zones to serve as contractors alongside U.S. troops and intelligence officers. And a number of them have been killed or wounded.

Windfall, by Meghan O'Sullivan

Simon & Schuster

Analysis & Opinions - LinkedIn

What energy abundance means for geopolitics: An interview with Meghan L. O’Sullivan, part 1 by Scott Nyquist

    Author:
  • Scott Nyquist
| Mar. 26, 2019

The subtitle tells the story. In the early 2000s, many pundits and politicians talked up “peak oil,” “energy scarcity,” and all that. In a geological heartbeat later—about a decade—the world had entered an era of “energy abundance,” largely due to innovations that allowed producers to crack into shale formations to release massive new sources of oil and gas. The United States has gone furthest and fastest in fracking and is setting records for oil and gas production. For the US, says O’Sullivan, this has been an economic, strategic, and environmental game-changer. For the rest of the world, the effects are more differentiated but hardly less profound.