Russia

1588 Items

A Tajik conscript looks out over remote stretches of northern Afghanistan from a border outpost near Khorog, Tajikistan.

Photo by David Trilling (c)

Report - Russia Matters

Jihadists from Ex-Soviet Central Asia: Where Are They? Why Did They Radicalize? What Next?

| Fall 2018

Thousands of radicals from formerly Soviet Central Asia have traveled to fight alongside IS in Syria and Iraq; hundreds more are in Afghanistan. Not counting the fighting in those three war-torn countries, nationals of Central Asia have been responsible for nearly 100 deaths in terrorist attacks outside their home region in the past five years. But many important aspects of the phenomenon need more in-depth study.

This research paper attempts to answer four basic sets of questions: (1) Is Central Asia becoming a new source of violent extremism that transcends borders, and possibly continents? (2) If so, why? What causes nationals of Central Asia to take up arms and participate in political violence? (3) As IS has been all but defeated in Iraq and Syria, what will Central Asian extremists who have thrown in their lot with the terrorist group do next? And (4) do jihadists from Central Asia aspire to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction? If so, how significant a threat do they pose and who would be its likeliest targets?

    Russian caricaturists gleefully poked fun at U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt.

    Library of Congress

    Journal Article - Russian History

    Images of Empire: Depictions of America in Late Imperial Russian Editorial Cartoons

    | 2018

    Although historians have paid much attention to American perceptions of Russia, few have looked at Russian views of the United States, particularly in the imperial period. This article surveys editorial cartoons in Novoe Vremia, one of the few Russian newspapers to publish illustrations as commentary on international affairs. Novoe Vremia published cartoons depicting the United States in the years between 1898 and 1912 in the late imperial period, that is, beginning with the War of 1898 and ending with the abrogation of the U.S.-Russia commercial treaty. 

    President George H.W. Bush

    Associated Press

    Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

    Once Upon a Time, U.S. Foreign Policy Worked

    | Dec. 02, 2018

    George H.W. Bush's administration was evidence of what the establishment was capable of. I worked on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff during the last two years of the late President George H.W. Bush’s administration. It was my first job in government and an extraordinary period in world history. As I came on board at Foggy Bottom, Bush had just facilitated Germany’s unification. The international coalition that he’d mobilized was in the process of evicting Saddam Hussein from Kuwait. In a few months’ time, Bush would help manage the peaceful unraveling of the Soviet Union and the launch of historic peace talks between Israel and its Arab neighbors via the Madrid process.

    One Fewer Reason to Be Nervous About the G-20 This Weekend

    Gage Skidmore/Flickr

    Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg Opinion

    One Fewer Reason to Be Nervous About the G-20 This Weekend

    | Nov. 29, 2018

    If asked what will be the most consequential meeting this weekend in Argentina at the G-20, you might have a hard time making up your mind. You’d have good reason to choose a) the Trump-Xi bilateral. But b), the gathering to sign the new Nafta deal, could also go awry. If you are like me, you are relieved that c), the Trump-Putin meeting, is now off the table.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to the media after the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina on December 1, 2018.

    Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

    Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

    Putin’s Remarks on Use of Nuclear Weapons Are Confusing, But Unlikely to Constitute a Shift in Nuclear Posture

    | Nov. 28, 2018

    Russian President Vladimir Putin’s eschatological talk of nuclear Armageddon at this year’s Valdai forum has stirred up heated debates on how well his description of Russia’s potential use of nuclear weapons matches the country’s official military doctrine. However, a close look at Putin’s Oct. 18 remarks and Russia’s 2014 military doctrine reveals that, while Putin deviated from the language in the doctrine, he did not lie on the first use issue. Nor did he seem to be hinting at a shift in Russia’s nuclear posture. More likely, he was signaling to Washington that the existing nuclear arms control treaties need to remain in place for the sake of ensuring strategic stability in the U.S.-Russian nuclear dyad and avoiding an accidental war between the two countries.

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    - US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism

    The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: June - November 2018

    | Nov. 21, 2018
    • Graham Allison on likelihood of another 9/11 and need to deny terrorists nuclear weapons.
    • Bunn and Roth on regaining nuclear security momentum.
    • New books on lessons of U.S.-Russian non-proliferation cooperation and on preventing illicit nuclear trade.
    • Study: Congress needs to play a more active role in nuclear security.