Russia

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Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Measuring National Power: Is Vladimir Putin’s Russia in Decline?

| May 04, 2018

As Vladimir Putin embarks on another six-year term as Russia’s president, Western pundits and policymakers are left wondering whether his reelection means that Moscow’s muscular policies toward America and other Western powers will continue or even escalate. But what is the reality of Russian power in the Putin era? Is Russia a rising, declining or stagnating power? How does its standing in the global order compare to other nations, including the United States, China and European powers?

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017. (Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP)

Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - METRO U.N.

The West and Russia

| Apr. 25, 2018

The West’s relationship with Russia has for a long time been and will continue to be a crucial determinant of global politics and stability regardless of internal divisions within the West that have always existed but which have increased in the wake of growing populism everywhere and the Trump Administration’s challenges to multilateral agreements. Nevertheless, reacting to Russian violations of international norms in recent years Western countries have repeatedly acted in unison imposing severe sanctions on Russia or stepping up their defense through NATO.

Opposition demonstrators gather in the Republic Square celebrating Armenian Prime Minister's Serzh Sargsyan's resignation in Yerevan, Armenia, Monday, April 23, 2018. (Davit Abrahamyan/PAN Photo via AP)

Davit Abrahamyan/PAN Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Armenia: Why Has Vladimir Putin Not Intervened So Far and Will He?

| Apr. 24, 2018

The resignation of Armenia’s Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan after more than a week of mass protests in Russia’s backyard begs the question: Why has Moscow not intervened so far? The fist-pumping demonstrators bring to mind “color revolutions” in the post-Soviet neighborhood that the Kremlin seems to abhor, like the ones in Georgia and Ukraine. But even genuine color revolutions (which Armenia has not yet seen—more on that below) are not enough by themselves to prompt Russia to stage either a covert or overt intervention. As I have argued before, for Moscow to intervene in one of its Soviet-era satellites at least two conditions need to be present: First, Vladimir Putin has to see an acute threat to Russia’s vital national interests, such as the potential expansion of antagonistic Western-led alliances too close to Russia’s borders; second, the chances for defending or advancing its interests through the use of force have to be relatively high.

Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow. April 18, 2018 (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press). Keywords: Vladimir Putin, Russia

Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Graham Allison on Russia: Insights and Recommendations

| Apr. 19, 2018

This evolving compilation of observations and policy ideas about Russia by Graham Allison is part of Russia Matters’ “Competing Views” rubric, where we share prominent American thinkers’ alternative takes on U.S.-Russian relations, Russia itself and America’s policies toward this country.

Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting with Agriculture Minister Alexander Tkachev in Moscow, Russia. April 9, 2018 (Credit: Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press). Keywords: Putin, Russia

Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The New Republic

The Problem With “Cold War” Comparisons

| Apr. 17, 2018

Disoriented in a historical re-play, as headlines would have it, that seems to have crammed the timeline from the Machtergreifung to the Truman Doctrine into a mere nine months, The New Republic called up prizewinning Cold War historian Arne Westad at Harvard Kennedy School to get his thoughts. Over the course of a short phone call, he offered his take on proxy conflicts, Putin’s motivations, and why Russia is in a weaker position than it may seem.

Amb. Nuland with Prof. Burns

Benn Craig/ Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions

Conversations in Diplomacy: Ambassador Victoria Nuland

| Apr. 11, 2018

In this installment of “Conversations in Diplomacy," the Future of Diplomacy Project's Faculty Director Nicholas Burns is joined by Ambassador Victoria Nuland, the former Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, for a conversation on the current situation in Syria and the recent developments in US-Russia relations.