22 Items

Sen. Angus King of Maine

Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Newspaper Article - Harvard Gazette

Senator Angus King: ‘We know’ Russia Hacked Election

  • Christina Pazzanese
| Nov. 28, 2017

Though President Trump says he is not convinced that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election, U.S. Sen. Angus King of Maine said Monday that he and his colleagues on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which is probing the matter, have “no doubt whatsoever” of Moscow’s involvement.

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Analysis & Opinions

Libyan State Media Cites Trump to Discredit CNN Story about Human Trafficking

| Nov. 28, 2017

Nicholas Burns joins Erin Burnett to discuss President Trump's dismissal of CNN as fake news, including CNN's latest report on the UN-backed Libyan government involvement in enslaving and trading people in Libya. "I think he's playing with fire. If America should stand for anything its against a modern slave market."

Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall speaking with Nicholas Burns

Andrew Facini/ Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

US Energy Policy: Ceding — not seeding — the terrain

Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, Fall 2017 Fisher Family Fellow at the Future of Diplomacy Project and Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs outlined the U.S. Department of Energy's role in diplomacy, "energy diplomacy," while she was Deputy Secretary for the Department. The conversation was moderated by Nicholas Burns, Faculty Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project and Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations.

Ambassador Douglas Lute speaks at the Future of Diplomacy Project

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project

NATO and Russia: An Uneasy Relationship

| Nov. 08, 2017

Ambassador Douglas Lute, former ambassador to the North Atlantic Council, NATO's principal decision-making body, spoke at the Future of Diplomacy project on NATO's role today, adapting to current threats, and Russia's relationship with NATO and its member States.

Graffiti depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump, on the walls of a bar in the old town in Vilnius, Lithuania on Saturday, May 4th, 2016. (AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis, File)

AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis

Analysis & Opinions - Literary Hub

The Mess We're In: On the Inevitability of Post-Cold War Chaos

| Sep. 28, 2017

If the United States won the Cold War, as I think it did, then the Soviet Union, or rather Russia, lost it, and lost it big. The main reason this happened was that its political leaders, in the Communist Party, did not give its own population a political, economic, or social system that was fit for purpose. The Soviet peoples had sacrificed immensely during the 20th century in an attempt at building a state and society of which they could be proud. The vast majority of citizens had believed that their hard work and defense of their achievements had created both a Superpower with a global reach and a better future for themselves. The ability to believe in improvement under Soviet rule, which would also be the pinnacle of Russian achievement, kept doubts away for the majority, even for those who ought to have known better. The crimes of the Soviet state were ignored by rulers and ruled alike, in a mutual conspiracy of silence.

Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump meet at the 2017 G-20 Hamburg Summit, July 7, 2017.

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

The One Big Problem With New Russia Sanctions

| Aug. 10, 2017

The latest round of congressional sanctions against Russia garnered much attention for the message they sent to President Donald Trump: We don’t trust you to decide when to lift or ease sanctions on Moscow. True, it was an important signal to the American people, the president and the rest of the world that nearly all of America’s legislators felt Russia had to pay a price interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential elections.

But there were two other important messages embedded in the sanctions bill that are equally interesting and consequential.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany on Friday, July 7, 2017 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci).

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Putin’s Bet on a Trump Presidency Backfires Spectacularly

| July 30, 2017

A little more than a year after the Russian effort to interfere in the American presidential election came to light, the diplomatic fallout — an unraveling of the relationship between Moscow and Washington on a scale not seen in decades — is taking its toll.