273 Items

Journalists watch as Russian President Vladimir Putin gives his annual state of the nation address


Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

I Knew the Cold War. This Is No Cold War.

| Mar. 12, 2018

None of this is to deny that U.S.-Russian relations are in a bad state. It is also hard to imagine someone as compromised as Donald Trump doing much to fix it. But instead of embracing the language and imagery of the Cold War, we would do better to think seriously about the missteps and blunders that have brought the United States and Russia to the present impasse, and look for creative new ways to unwind them.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with Russian gas monopoly Gazprom head Alexei Miller at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow. February 16, 2018 (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press). Keywords: Vladimir Putin

Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Four Steps to Fight Foreign Interference in U.S. Elections

| Feb. 14, 2018

Election systems differ from state to state and precinct to precinct, but many still have security vulnerabilities that foreign actors — not just the Russians — can exploit. The U.S. government must act to improve security and assure Americans that their votes count.

US Army Soldiers at Fort Bragg, NC September 13, 2017 (Johnathon Drake/Reuters). Keywords: Fort Bragg

Johnathon Drake/Reuters

Analysis & Opinions - Carnegie Moscow Center

Making Sense of the U.S. National Defense Strategy

| Feb. 05, 2018

Many of the threats and missions identified in the 2018 National Defense Strategy Summary are similar to those of earlier defense strategies. But the priorities have changed dramatically. The 2018 NDS declares that “interstate strategic competition, not terrorism, is now the primary national security concern,” and the United States is in a “long-term strategic competition” with its main adversaries Russia and China.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, July 4, 2017. 


Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The Autocrat's Achilles' Heel

| Feb. 02, 2018

"There seem to be no effective checks to Putin and Xi’s growing ambitions. Both leaders, however, could be making a strategic error. They are staking their countries’ futures, and international trajectories, on one thing: themselves. Throughout their respective reigns, Putin and Xi have taken steps to consolidate their personal control on power. This may work as a stabilizing mechanism in the short term, but in the long term, can exacerbate inherent domestic tensions that could eventually undermine their rule."

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, and Russian President Vladimir Putin walk after a news conference and talks in Ankara, Turkey on Sept. 28, 2017 (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici).

AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Will the Center Hold?

| Dec. 21, 2017

The most important question facing the United States – and in many ways the world – after the events of 2017 is this: Will Yeats’ fearful prophecy that “Things fall apart; the center cannot hold” come true? Will it continue to seem that “The best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity”? It is hard not to be concerned, but it is too soon to anticipate failure.