South Asia

11 Items

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

5 Burning Nuclear Problems on Trump’s Desk

| Jan. 25, 2017

Nuclear weapons remain the most powerful weapons on the planet and how President Donald Trump’s team manages nuclear issues is critical to our security. These are hard challenges; none were perfectly addressed under President Obama’s leadership. But we made them a priority from day one. Whether or not the new team puts them at the top of the to-do list, here are five issues that will demand their attention before too long.

Visitors look at a Intelligent Energy hydrogen fuel cell motorcycle at the 10th Auto Expo in New Delhi, India, Jan. 6, 2010.

AP Photo

Policy Brief - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Energy Innovation Policy in Major Emerging Countries

New Harvard Kennedy School research finds that energy research, development, and demonstration (ERD&D) funding by governments and 100 percent government-owned enterprises in six major emerging economies appears larger than government spending on ERD&D in most industrialized countries combined. That makes the six so-called BRIMCS countries—Brazil, Russia, India, Mexico, China, and South Africa—major players in the development of new energy technologies. It also suggests there could be opportunities for cooperation on energy technology development among countries.

Border Security Force soldiers patrol the border with Pakistan in Gujarat, Nov. 25, 2009. Indian PM Manmohan Singh raised fears about Pakistani Taliban forces moving into the heart of Pakistan, which threatens both Pakistan's government and India.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Daily Star

Pakistan and India Should Consider Collaborating This Time

| December 4, 2009

"At every stage of the lengthy conflict that has brought the US into the region, Pakistan has sought to limit Indian influence in Afghanistan. Indeed, India's growing influence and investment in Afghanistan is disturbing to Pakistan's national security apparatus. Ultimately, the dynamics of Afghan politics will determine Afghanistan's fate. But a collaborative Indian-Pakistani effort to stabilize the country could work wonders."

People of various faiths participate in a multi-faith candle light vigil to commemorate the 2008 terror attacks at Nariman House in Mumbai, India, Nov. 17, 2009. Nariman House is the Chabad center that was targeted by the terrorists.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Hindu

Lessons and Challenges for Pakistan

| November 25, 2009

Pakistan has an ideal opportunity to show to India that it is fully committed to defeat terrorism in all its shapes and forms. Political rhetoric for public consumption on the subject, both in India and Pakistan, should not be allowed to disrupt honest and professional investigations of the Mumbai attacks. All other disputes between the two countries should be dealt with and tackled separately from this case and no quid pro quo arrangement or expectation should come in the way of giving an exemplary punishment to those responsible for this crime against humanity. This includes all who are to be found involved in planning, facilitating, or orchestrating the atrocity.

People carry a banner during a silent protest march in Bangalore, India, Dec. 27, 2008, as they honor the Mumbai terror attack victims. Pakistan told India it did not want war and would use force only if attacked.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Guatemala Times

South Asia at War

| January 7, 2009

"Last month's terrorist assault in Mumbai targeted not only India's economy and sense of security. Its broader goal was to smash the India-Pakistan détente that has been taking shape since 2004. The attackers did not hide their faces or blow themselves up with suicide jackets. Anonymity was not their goal. They wanted to be identified as defenders of a cause. Unless this cause is fully understood, and its roots revealed across the region, this attack may prove to be the beginning of the unmaking of South Asia."

A Kashmir Muslim woman returns after casting her vote as Indian paramilitary soldiers stand guard in Bandipora 75 KM from Srinagar, India, Nov. 17, 2008. State elections opened in India's part of Kashmir amid boycott calls by Muslim separatists.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - News International

Beyond the Line of Control

| December 7, 2008

Naomi Klein, Canadian columnist and author of The Shock Doctrine insightfully says, "Terrorism doesn't just blow up buildings; it blasts every other issue off the political map. The spectre of terrorism — real and exaggerated — has become a shield of impunity, protecting governments around the world from scrutiny for their human rights abuses." South Asia today is a victim of terror in this context. Social injustice, political instability, religious fanaticism and a rising sense of insecurity are the factors pushing South Asians to the brink of a prolonged conflict.

Pakistan's army troops stand alert behind a bunker as they monitor the Afghan-Pakistan border at Kundighar post, the area of Pakistani tribal belt of North Waziristan.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Solving FATA

| August 13, 2008

"The growing Taliban insurgency in the Afghan-Pakistan border area increasingly threatens the geography of the region. Continuation of this crisis could derail the India-Pakistan peace process, undermine democratic gains in Pakistan as well as Afghanistan, and jeopardize U.S. interests in the region.

Despite the explosive nature of the crisis and apparent consensus between the Democratic and Republican presidential nominees about the need for additional focus on the area—as well as military forces there—the popular analysis of the situation often fails to appreciate the very basic facts of the issue...."

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

The Elections Must Go Ahead

| December 31, 2007

Without credible elections, restoration of the independent judiciary and effective curbs on the activities of the country's intelligence agencies in internal affairs, Pakistan cannot be rescued from a certain slide into more chaos. Pakistan's history is full of cover-ups and Bhutto's murder is proving to be no different.

Analysis & Opinions - The Financial Express

Towards Better Coal Power Technology Policies

| March 13, 2007

Coal-based power plants are—and will continue to be—the backbone of India’s energy engine. They currently account for about 69 out of 128-gigawatt installed capacity of utilities, and projections by the Planning Commission indicate that coal will fuel the power sector for at least the next three decades.