South Asia

16 Items

Announcement - Managing the Atom Project, Belfer Center

2016-2017 Harvard Nuclear Policy Fellowships

| December 15, 2015

The Project on Managing the Atom offers fellowships for pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and mid-career researchers for one year, with a possibility for renewal, in the stimulating environment of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School. The online application for 2016-2017 fellowships opened December 15, 2015, and the application deadline is January 15, 2016. Recommendation letters are due by February 1, 2016.

Presentation - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Preventing Nuclear War in South Asia: Unprecedented Challenges, Unprecedented Solutions

    Author:
  • George Perkovich
| Oct. 03, 2013

At 6:00 PM on October 3, 2013, George Perkovich, Vice President for Studies and
Director of the Nuclear Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, gave the 2013 Robert McNamara Lecture on War and Peace, titled "Preventing Nuclear War in South Asia: Unprecedented Challenges, Unprecedented Solutions."

A Pakistani police commando keeps position on a rooftop post in outskirts of Peshawar, Pakistan, Sept. 14, 2008. Pakistan's military killed at least 24 militants in clashes near the Afghan border where Taliban and al-Qaida fighters are believed hiding.

AP Photo

Journal Article - CTC Sentinel

From FATA to the NWFP: The Taliban Spread Their Grip in Pakistan

| September 2008

"...Any effort to stem the tide of extremism in the NWFP first requires a dispassionate analysis of the ground realities. This article attempts to examine such indicators, by explaining how the Taliban have managed to spread their influence from FATA into the NWFP, and will present some ideas on how to reverse extremist trends...."

Pakistan's army troops stand alert behind a bunker as they monitor the Afghan-Pakistan border at Kundighar post, the area of Pakistani tribal belt of North Waziristan.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Solving FATA

| August 13, 2008

"The growing Taliban insurgency in the Afghan-Pakistan border area increasingly threatens the geography of the region. Continuation of this crisis could derail the India-Pakistan peace process, undermine democratic gains in Pakistan as well as Afghanistan, and jeopardize U.S. interests in the region.

Despite the explosive nature of the crisis and apparent consensus between the Democratic and Republican presidential nominees about the need for additional focus on the area—as well as military forces there—the popular analysis of the situation often fails to appreciate the very basic facts of the issue...."

Pakistan's army troops patrol on the street to ensure security ahead of the parliamentary elections in Multan, Pakistan on Feb. 16, 2008.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The International News

Security and Intelligence

| February 25, 2008

"The Pakistani Army positively contributed towards the holding of free elections on Feb 18, but it cannot be expected to do the job of law enforcement endlessly. Dependence on the military for such tasks ultimately persuades its leadership to increase the army’s involvement in the political domain, and in the process that follows such thinking, Pakistan loses many years. Generals like Waheed Kakar and Jahangir Karamat are rare, and given some recent developments it seems that Pakistan is lucky to have another of their kind in the form of the new chief, Ashfaq Pervez Kayani. This golden opportunity should not be lost (like before) to nurture and groom civilian institutions to stand on their own feet."

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

The Elections Must Go Ahead

| December 31, 2007

Without credible elections, restoration of the independent judiciary and effective curbs on the activities of the country's intelligence agencies in internal affairs, Pakistan cannot be rescued from a certain slide into more chaos. Pakistan's history is full of cover-ups and Bhutto's murder is proving to be no different.

Magazine Article - Terrorism Monitor

The Road to Lal Masjid and its Aftermath

| July 19, 2007

"It is clear that most Pakistanis wanted Lal Masjid (Red Mosque) leader Maulana Abdul Rashid Ghazi to be held accountable for his vigilantism and for trying to enforce his extremist version of Islam on society. The public's views have changed, however, now that it has become obvious that the government used indiscriminate force during the operation and since its claims about the presence of foreign militants inside the mosque complex have not been independently verified."