Conflict & Conflict Resolution

825 Items

Bosnia President Alija Izetbegovic, left, shakes hands with Croatia President Franjo Tudjman in Dayton, Ohio, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 1995.

AP Photo/Joe Marquette

Journal Article - International Security

How Civil Wars End: The International System, Norms, and the Role of External Actors

| Winter 2017/18

Historically, most civil wars have ended with the military defeat of the losing side. In the 1990s, by contrast, civil wars usually ended with a negotiated settlement. What accounts for this anomaly?

Airstrikes target Islamic State positions on the edge of Mosul's Old City

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

ISIS' Intelligence Service Refuses to Die

| Nov. 22, 2017

"In Iraq, the war of weapons is over, but the war of information is not. First of all, many of the most experienced and dedicated Emni members were able to escape when ISIS fell. Compared to ISIS fighters, they enjoyed relative freedom of movement, so when the Iraqi operation in Mosul started, many agents moved to liberated territories, from which they updated ISIS on the movement of Iraqi forces. Even now, their presence is no secret to local civilians."

Journal Article - Journal of Conflict Resolution

International Peacekeeping and Positive Peace: Evidence from Kosovo

| November 2017

To what extent can international peacekeeping promote micro-foundations for positive peace after violence? Drawing on macro-level peacekeeping theory, the authors' approach uses novel experimental methods to illustrate how monitoring and enforcement by a neutral third party could conceivably enhance prosocial behavior between rival groups in a tense, postconflict peacekeeping environment.

portion of of a boat that capsized while it was bound for Bangladesh, filled with Rohingya refugees from Myanmar

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Slate

Calling a Genocide a Genocide

| Oct. 31, 2017

"If we're careful to avoid crying genocide when it's not warranted, we should be all the more confident about doing so when it is. And in Myanmar, the signs of genocide are there for anyone who knows how to read them. Not in the scale or savagery of the violence, although both are shocking, but in the evidence of the military’s intent to eradicate the Rohingya minority."