Economics & Global Affairs

2359 Items

Panelists on stage during hydrogen discussion at Rome Med 2022

Rome MED – Mediterranean Dialogue

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Is Hydrogen Our Future?

On December 3, 2022, Nicola De Blasio, Senior Fellow with the Belfer Center’s Environment and Natural Resources Program (ENRP), chaired a panel discussion, “Is Hydrogen Our Future?,” at the Rome MED – Mediterranean Dialogue (Rome MED), an annual high-level conference on Mediterranean geopolitics. The panel discussion was part of ENRP’s Future of Hydrogen project’s ongoing engagement with global policymakers, who are increasingly viewing hydrogen as a solution to meeting their decarbonization and energy security goals. 

A container ship of Chinese Cosco shipping lies in the harbor in Hamburg, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022

AP Photo/Michael Probst

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Belt and Road Initiative in Europe: Opportunities for a Transatlantic Response Amid the Russian Invasion of Ukraine

| January 2023

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has for years held a prominent position in the global infrastructure investment space. In the absence of similarly far-reaching projects coordinated by other countries including the transatlantic partners, important questions about the BRI’s implications for Europe and America arise. Given U.S.-China competition pulling the EU in two directions and opposing approaches among member states vis-à-vis China amid a globally growing infrastructure investment gap, the need for a liberally motivated large-scale infrastructure investment approach is clear. This alternative model of advancing economic development goals stands in opposition to the BRI’s approach of creating economic dependence on China through massive recipient country debt thereby increasing Chinese geopolitical power. 

Sri Lankan port workers hold a Chinese national flag to welcome Chinese research ship

AP/Eranga Jayawardena, File

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Peak China?

| Jan. 03, 2023

Joseph Nye writes: From an American perspective, it is just as dangerous to underestimate Chinese power as it is to overestimate it. While hysteria creates fear, discounting China's recent progress and future ambitions could lead the United States to squander its own long-term advantages.

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Blog Post - views-on-the-economy-and-the-world

The Global Economy as of End-2022

| Dec. 24, 2022

Economists spent most of 2022 convincing themselves that the global economy was about to fall into recession, if it wasn’t already in one.  With the year over, the global recession has now been postponed to 2023.

  1. Tour d’horizon

In the US, reports that a recession had begun in the first half of the year clearly were premature, especially given how tight the labor market was.  It still is. The chances of a downturn in the coming year are well below 100%, despite the confidence with which many say it is certain.  It is foolish to think we can predict a recession with certainty. But the chances are indeed far above the usual 15 %.  I would put the odds at perhaps 50-50 in 2023 and 75% at some point during the next two years.  The main reason is the rapid raising of interest rates by the Fed (and other central banks), of course, which in turn is attributable to high inflation.

Two men in front of a computer screen

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Is a Global Recession Really Around the Corner?

| Dec. 22, 2022

While there are signs that the “everything bubble” is about to burst, leading economists’ predictions that the world economy is headed toward a major slump in the coming year seem premature. While hard times are almost certainly coming, the mainstream definition – two consecutive quarters of negative growth – is a very high bar.

An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia

AP Photo, File

Policy Brief - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

The Price Cap on Russian Oil Exports, Explained

| Dec. 05, 2022

The price cap on Russian oil implemented today by the G7 countries plus Australia represents a novel approach to sanctions. The policy is designed to reduce Russian fossil fuel revenues while keeping Russian oil on the market. In this brief, Catherine Wolfram, Simon Johnson, and Łukasz Rachel explain the basic economic principles at work and discuss some of the critiques of the price cap. 

An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia,

AP Photo, File

Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

Price Cap on Russian Oil a ‘Novel Approach to Sanctions’, Says New Policy Brief

| Dec. 05, 2022

The price cap on Russian oil implemented today by the G7 countries plus Australia represents a novel approach to sanctions, according to a policy brief authored by Catherine Wolfram, Simon Johnson, and Łukasz Rachel and released today by Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government.