Economics & Global Affairs

251 Items

Tokyo at night

Flickr / Agustin Rafael Reyes

Paper - London School of Economics

Global Review of Finance For Sustainable Urban Infrastructure

    Authors:
  • Graham Floater
  • Dan Dowling
  • Denise Chan
  • Matthew Ulterino
  • Tim McMinn
  • Ehtisham Ahmad
| December 2017

This paper is a background review representing part of the initial phase of the Financing the Urban Transition work program. The review builds on a growing body of research that highlights both the importance of national sustainable infrastructure and the need to develop more effective and efficient financing mechanisms for delivering compact, connected cities that meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. While progress has been made in both these areas over the last five years, there remains a policy gap between the international/national level and the municipal level.

From left, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan, U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. first lady Melania Trump are shown at the Great Hall of the people in Beijing on Thursday, November 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump has Ceded Economic Leadership to China

| Nov. 15, 2017

President Donald Trump’s recent Asia trip casts further doubts about America’s long-term standing and commitment in the region. In particular, his “America first” speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam cast a shadow on America’s willingness to cooperate with Asian allies.

Sample financial portfolio viewed on an iPad.

Pxhere

Analysis & Opinions - VoxEU

Democratizing Finance: The Digital Wealth Management Revolution

| Nov. 11, 2017

Despite specialised press coverage, little is known about the potential wider socioeconomic implications of digital wealth management solutions. This column examines how ‘robo-advisors’ offer an opportunity to democratise finance and decrease wealth inequality. These algorithmic investment advisors stand to disrupt the wealth management sector through their ‘low-cost, accessible to most’ business models. However, the entrance of traditional wealth managers into the robo-advisor market could threaten this disruption.

A woman walks past an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 index and other county's index at a securities firm in Tokyo on Monday, October 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

The Curious Case of the Missing Defaults

| Nov. 01, 2017

Booms and busts in international capital flows and commodity prices, as well as the vagaries of international interest rates, have long been associated with economic crises, especially – but not exclusively – in emerging markets. The “type” of crisis varies by time and place. Sometimes the “sudden stop” in capital inflows sparks a currency crash, sometimes a banking crisis, and quite often a sovereign default. Twin and triple crises are not uncommon.

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Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Harvard Kennedy School’s Middle East Initiative Welcomes Dr. Salam Fayyad as Senior Fellow

| Sep. 20, 2017

The Middle East Initiative (MEI) at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs announced today that Salam Fayyad, former Prime Minister of the the Palestinian Authority, will join the HKS community as a Senior Fellow this academic year.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, talks with Mario Draghi, head of the European Central Bank, and Haruhiko Kuroda, head of the Bank of Japan, during a break at the central bankers conference at Jackson Hole, Wyo., Friday, Aug. 25, 2017. The conference, in its 41st year, is sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. (AP Photo/Martin Crutsinger)

AP Photo/Martin Crutsinger

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

The Persistence of Global Imbalances

| Aug. 30, 2017

The primary focus of this year’s Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, which convenes the world’s leading central bankers, was not explicitly monetary policy. Fed Chair Janet Yellen’s opening remarks emphasized the changes in regulatory policy that followed the 2008 global financial crisis, while European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s luncheon address dwelled on the need for continued reforms in Europe to sustain the eurozone’s recent economic recovery.

International Monetary Fund Economic Counsellor Maurice Obstfeld speaks at a news conference during the World Bank/IMF Annual Meetings on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, at IMF headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Recovery is Not Resolution

| Aug. 01, 2017

Earlier this year, the consensus view among economists was that the United States would outstrip its advanced-economy rivals. The expected US growth spurt would be driven by the economic stimulus package described in President Donald Trump’s election campaign. But the most notable positive economic news of 2017 among the developed countries has been coming from Europe.

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook on ARD

ARD.de

Analysis & Opinions - ARD Online

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook discusses the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act and international money laundering on ARD (in German)

July 07, 2017

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook discusses the international implications of changes to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act as well as the revelations of the Panama Papers with respect to international money laundering and G-7/G-20 measures to counter macro-economic inefficiencies.