Energy

99 Items

Book - Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Economics of the Environment: Selected Readings

| 2019

Now in its seventh edition, Economics of the Environment serves as a valuable supplement to environmental economics text books and as a stand-alone reference book of key, up-to-date readings from the field. Edited by Robert N. Stavins, the book covers the core areas of environmental economics courses as taught around the world; and the included authors are the top scholars in the field. Overall, more than half of the chapters are new to this edition while the rest have remained seminal works.

Robert Stavins

Martha Stewart

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project's Robert Stavins is Co-recipient of the Publication of Enduring Quality Award

June 13, 2017

The Publication of Enduring Quality award of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) recognizes works that are of seminal nature and with enduring value in environmental and resource economics. This year, AERE recognized two influential empirical papers on induced innovation in environmental economics: “The Induced Innovation Hypothesis and Energy-Saving Technological Change,” by Richard G. Newell, Adam B. Jaffe, and Robert N. Stavins, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 114, No. 3 (1999), pp. 941-975; and "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," by David Popp, American Economic Review, Vol. 92, No. 1 (2002), pp. 160–180.

Analysis & Opinions - PBS NEWSHOUR

What Does Trump's Victory Mean for Climate Change Policy?

| November 11, 2016

"...[T]here are a myriad of subnational climate change policies, ranging from AB-32 in California to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative in the Northeast. It is not a coincidence that there is a high — although not perfect — correlation between these states and those Hillary Clinton won in the election."

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Goodbye to the Climate

| November 9, 2016

"If he lives up to his campaign rhetoric, Mr. Trump may indeed be able to reverse course on climate change policy, increasing the threat to our planet, and in the process destroy much of the Obama legacy in this important realm. This will make the states even more important players on this critical issue."

Journal Article - Nature Energy

Political Economy of Clinton's Ambitious Energy Program

| October 2016

"Hillary Clinton's campaign has stressed her continuity with Obama's energy policy on key aspects such as decarbonization of the US economy, technological innovation and global cooperation. However, policy reforms to deliver long-term climate goals might be out of reach in a highly divided Congress."

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Federal Coal Program Reform, the Clean Power Plan, and the Interaction of Upstream and Downstream Climate Policies

    Authors:
  • Todd D. Gerarden
  • W. Spencer Reeder
  • James Stock
| June 2016

Can supply-side environmental policies that limit the extraction of fossil fuels reduce CO2 emissions? We study interactions between a specific supply-side policy — an environmental charge on federal coal — and demand-side emissions regulation under the Clean Power Plan (CPP). Using a detailed dynamic model of the power sector, we estimate that, absent the CPP, an environmental charge equal to the social cost of carbon would generate three-quarters of the projected CPP emissions reductions. With the CPP in place, the charge reduces emissions by reducing leakage and causing the CPP to be non-binding in some scenarios.

Solar power plant between Waldshut and Tiengen, Waldshut-Tiengen, Germany, 10 August 2010. Germany hosts the most solar capacity in the world.

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Subsidies in the Wrong Places Skew Renewable Energy's Power

| May 3, 2016

"Given the existing low-cost competition in a no-growth market, renewable developers face tough investment challenges absent new policies. A carbon tax could substantially increase market demand for renewable power and encourage the retirement of pollution-intensive coal-fired power plants."

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

COP-21 & The Pathway to Paris

January 2016

Climate change is a global problem that will require global solutions. Harvard Kennedy School expects to be a part of the solution through the development of academically rigorous research and ideas, and by engaging policymakers, non-governmental actors, practitioners, scholars, and others from around the world.