Energy

242 Items

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin during their joint news conference at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018.

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Analysis & Opinions - Just Security

Helsinki Summit: A Time for Choosing—Three observations by former senior CIA officer

| July 16, 2018

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen: "The US intelligence community can no longer trust the President’s judgment after he clearly sided with Russia in the Mueller investigation and the underlying intelligence information that formed the basis of the indictments of twelve Russian military intelligence officers."

Trump Wouldn’t Owe Putin a ‘Thank You’ for Selling More Oil

Kremlin.ru/Wikimedia Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg Opinion

Trump Wouldn’t Owe Putin a ‘Thank You’ for Selling More Oil

| July 14, 2018

After a tumultuous week of unpredictable twists and turns during President Donald Trump’s visit to Europe, anxiety levels have risen among experts and policy makers about the coming summit between Trump and President Vladimir Putin. As President Trump himself has noted, there is no shortage of issues demanding the attention of the two leaders: Syria, Iran, arms control and — who knows — maybe even Russia’s interference in America’s elections. But energy could snake its way onto the agenda, and Trump needs to be careful not to give Putin concessions in exchange for something the Russian president already plans on doing.

U.S. Ambassador to NATO Kay Bailey Hutchison speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday, July 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Analysis & Opinions - The Hill

Safeguarding NATO from Trump

| July 10, 2018

The Atlantic Alliance that was born to defend democracy against authoritarianism has survived many crises over its nearly 70 years. But ahead of the NATO Summit on July 11, President Trump’s hostility to our shared interests and values could rupture U.S.-European bonds irreparably just at a time when no major international challenge can be met by one nation alone.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo shakes hands with German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas at the State Department on Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Mass has lamented that “the Atlantic has become wider” during Trump's presidency. 

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump Hurls a Wrecking Ball at the Transatlantic Alliance

| June 21, 2018

Trump’s “America First” policies have shaken many of the nations that looked to Washington as their ally and protector. Europeans were dazed and in denial during the first year of Trump’s presidency, but they’re now talking about ways to fight back.

Elizabeth Arnold and Alice Rogoff speak to HKS students and community members about the dire need for a more complete Arctic media narrative on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. (Belfer Center Media Services)

Belfer Center Media Services

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

From Polar Bears to People: Getting the Arctic Climate Change Story Right

    Author:
  • Jonathan Edel-Hänni
| May 03, 2018

The Arctic is region is growing rapidly in global prominence, due in large part to the environmental changes caused by global warming. Rising temperatures and the receding sea ice reveal untapped natural resources and lucrative new trade routes. Non-Arctic nations, including China and India, are joining in the discourse on the region as new economic opportunities open up. Meanwhile, the four million human residents of the land north of the Arctic circle, many of them Indigenous peoples, are facing the reality of dramatically changing life because of human-caused climate change and an uncertain future.

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Analysis & Opinions - World Politics Review

Iran and Pakistan Navigate Regional Rivalries as They Push for Deeper Ties

| Apr. 06, 2018

In mid-March, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif traveled to Islamabad for a three-day visit, heading a 30-member Iranian delegation. During talks with Pakistani Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, Zarif pledged to increase bilateral trade between Iran and Pakistan from around $1.16 billion today to $5 billion by 2021. They also discussed other areas of cooperation. In an email interview, Payam Mohseni, the director of the Iran Project at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, discusses how Iran and Pakistan’s mutual desire for a deeper relationship must contend with regional rivalries. 

Photo of UN headquarters in New York

Neptuul/CC BY-SA 3.0

Analysis & Opinions - METRO U.N.

Have member states failed the UN Charter?

| Mar. 28, 2018

The framers of the UN Charter negotiated its stipulations amidst the ongoing carnage of World War II and while the memories of the League of Nations’ failure were still fresh. They hoped for a renewed and successful effort to create a lasting peace but were aware that it required the complete adherence of all member states to the requirements of the Charter. But it was not to happen. The unrestrained pursuit of national interests and the Cold War continuously prevented the implementation of basic demands of the Charter. Due to the Soviet Union’s absence, the UN was exceptionally able to act in the Korean War and then again for several years after the end of the Cold War against aggression and terrorism.

U.N. Security Council ambassadors, right side, meet Afghan officials in Herat, Afghanistan, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. (AP Photo/Fraidoon Pooyaa)

AP Photo/Fraidoon Pooyaa

Analysis & Opinions - METRO U.N.

Cooperation Must be Preserved

| Mar. 14, 2018

The debate about the effectiveness of the Security Council in creating peace and security in the world is as old as the institution. For many years practitioners and scholars have discussed how factors such as the role of major powers, the unrepresentative structure of its permanent membership, or their veto power affect the Council’s impact on world politics. Such debates are legitimate and profoundly necessary, but in the present international situation a more fundamental challenge has arisen, that threatens the very foundation on which institutions like the UN are built: the assault on multilateralism and on the concept of a rules based international order that relies on cooperation among nations as its guiding norm. Unless that assault is effectively resisted, attempts at reforming or improving this or that international institution have scant chances of success.