Environment & Climate Change

227 Items

Robert Stavins

Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Newspaper Article - Harvard Gazette

Separating Signal from Noise at COP26

    Author:
  • Alvin Powell
| Nov. 17, 2021

For an assessment of what was done, and left undone, at the recent United Nations’ Conference of the Parties on climate change, the Gazette spoke with Rob Stavins, the Harvard Kennedy School’s A.J. Meyer Professor of Energy and Economic Development and head of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, who attended his first COP in 2007 in Bali. 

A container ship of the shipping line Hamburg Süd passing under the Golden Gate Bridge

Wikimedia CC/Frank Schulenburg

Analysis & Opinions - Resources Magazine

A Solution to the Competitiveness Risks of Climate Policy: Countervailing Duty Law

| Oct. 05, 2021

Joseph Aldy describes how the United States can work toward its ambitious climate goals and ensure a level playing field for U.S. businesses by using countervailing duties under international trade law, without the need for new legislation.

Audio - Resources Radio

When Will the Sun Set on Fossil Fuel Subsidies?

| Sep. 07, 2021

Joseph Aldy describes the challenge of reforming fossil fuel subsidies, given uncertainty about how much subsidies actually cost governments and given provisions in the US tax code that privilege fossil fuels over renewable energy sources. Aldy also elaborates on some policies that the Biden administration—which has committed to removing fossil fuel subsidies—could target as policymakers develop infrastructure legislation.

Audio - Harvard Environmental Economics Program

Policy Options for Addressing Climate Change: A Conversation with Larry Goulder

| Aug. 09, 2021

Stanford University Professor Lawrence Goulder analyzed the different policy options available for addressing climate change in the latest episode of “Environmental Insights: Discussions on Policy and Practice from the Harvard Environmental Economics Program,” a podcast produced by the Harvard Environmental Economics Program.

Audio - Harvard Environmental Economics Program

Assessing the Biden Administration's Climate Policy: A Conversation with John Holdren

| July 08, 2021

John Holdren, former director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, expressed his optimism in the Biden Administration’s approach to climate policy in the latest episode of “Environmental Insights: Discussions on Policy and Practice from the Harvard Environmental Economics Program,” a podcast produced by the Harvard Environmental Economics Program.

Shenzhen Skyline

Wikimedia CC/Sparkfour

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project Conducts Research Workshop on Guangdong Province’s CO2 Emissions Trading System

    Author:
  • Robert C. Stowe
| July 08, 2021

The Harvard Project conducted a research workshop in June 2021, “Prospects for Guangdong Province’s Emissions Trading System.” Guangdong Province ranks first in economic output among China’s provinces and will play a major role in achieving increasingly ambitious national emissions-reduction targets. Guangdong’s emissions-trading system is, in turn, a key policy instrument in the Province’s climate-action plan.

Audio - Harvard Environmental Economics Program

How Politics Impacts Climate Policy: A Conversation with Gernot Wagner

| June 08, 2021

Gernot Wagner, Clinical Associate Professor at New York University and former economist at the Environmental Defense Fund, shared his thoughts on the impact of politics on climate policy in the latest episode of “Environmental Insights: Discussions on Policy and Practice from the Harvard Environmental Economics Program,” a podcast produced by the Harvard Environmental Economics Program.

Isle de Jean Charles

DeSmog/Julie Dermansky

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Managing the Climate Crisis May Require a Managed Retreat

| May 31, 2021

Richard Murray and Daniel Schrag write that President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan offers a generational opportunity to hit the reset button and invest in a more resilient and economically sustainable future. It can cover the costs of some of the critical investments needed to protect coastal communities.  Policymakers need to make difficult decisions — and now, based on the knowledge of how and why the seas are rising — to encourage people and communities to adapt to the new, future coast, without promises of a perfect safety net that the country cannot afford.

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Investor Rewards to Climate Responsibility: Stock-Price Responses to the Opposite Shocks of the 2016 and 2020 U.S. Elections

    Authors:
  • Stefano Ramelli
  • Alexandre Ziegler
  • Richard Zeckhauser
| May 2021

Donald Trump’s 2016 election and his nomination of climate skeptic Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency drastically downshifted expectations on U.S. policy toward climate change. Joseph Biden’s 2020 election shifted them dramatically upward. The authors study firms’ stock-price movements in reaction. As expected, the 2016 election boosted carbon-intensive firms. Surprisingly, firms with climate-responsible strategies also gained, especially those firms held by long-run investors. Such investors appear to have bet on a ‘‘boomerang’’ in climate policy. Harbingers of a boomerang already appeared during Trump’s term. The 2020 election marked its arrival.