Environment & Climate Change

56 Items

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

US Withdrawal from the Paris Agreement: Economic Implications of Carbon-Tariff Conflicts

    Authors:
  • Christoph Böhringer
  • Thomas F. Rutherford
| August 2017

Authors Christoph Böhringer and Thomas Rutherford evaluate the efficacy of imposing carbon tariffs on U.S. imports as an alternative to U.S. participation in the Paris Agreement. The authors warn that carbon tariffs on the United States could lead to a tariff war that ultimately hurts China, in particular, and the European Union more than the United States.

Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Bilateral Cooperation between China and the United States: Facilitating Progress on Climate-Change Policy

| February 2016

The Harvard Project has released a paper on China-U.S. cooperation on climate-change policy—jointly authored with researchers at China's National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation.

UN Conference on Climate Change (COP 21) in Paris, France, November 30, 2015.

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

What the WTO Can Learn from Paris Climate Talks

| December 7, 2015

"For many years, negotiators at the annual conferences of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change looked longingly at how the World Trade Organization was able to negotiate effective international agreements. Ironically, the Paris climate talks that are scheduled to conclude on Friday and the WTO negotiations, which will take place next week in Nairobi, lead to the opposite conclusion. Trade negotiators should emulate the progress made in the climate change agreements by moving away from a simplistic division between developed and developing countries."

Harvard Project Director Robert Stavins speaking at a side-event panel discussion in Paris on December 4, 2015.

Courtesy of HKS

Magazine Article - Harvard Gazette

Harvard's Stavins, Stowe Compare Climate Change Policies in Paris

    Author:
  • Doug Gavel
| December 6, 2015

"The role of market mechanisms for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and the relationship between climate change policy and international trade were the topics of a side-event panel discussion on Friday at the Conference of the Parties (COP21), the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris. The panel discussion, which was co-sponsored by the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, addressed a variety of issues related to the emissions-reduction targets that countries are putting forward as part of a new agreement to be concluded in Paris."

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Internationally-Tradable Permits Can Be Riskier for a Country than an Internally-Imposed Carbon Price

    Author:
  • Martin L. Weitzman
| September 2015

Uncertainty in the form of country-specific abatement-cost shocks, together with cross-border revenue flows from internationally-tradable permits, can lead to greater country risk from an international emissions-trading system than from the imposition of a uniform carbon price.

Magazine Article - Harvard Kennedy School Magazine

From the Ground Up: the Value of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements is Coming into Clear Focus

    Author:
  • Susannah Ketchum Glass
| Summer 2015

"We insist on being policy-relevant but not policy-prescriptive," Stavins says. "And that is something the negotiating teams appreciate. Whereas many groups have an ax to grind, we do not; we just want to help them understand the nature and dimensions of specific issues and how they can address them."

Participants in the workshop, "Bilateral Cooperation between China and the United States: Facilitating Progress on Climate-Change Policy"

NCSC Photo

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Harvard Project Co-organizes Workshop with Beijing Research Institute

    Author:
  • Robert C. Stowe
| August 26, 2015

The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements co-organized a workshop on China-U.S. collaboration on climate-change policy on June 25–26, 2015 in Beijing. The workshop was hosted and co-organized by the National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation.

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Robert Stavins Presents at Future Energy Forum

    Author:
  • Bryan Galcik
| July 20, 2015

Professor Stavins explained how the global commons dilemma provides a disincentive for action on climate change by individual countries since the climate benefits they gain individually would be less than the cost of action, while on a global basis the benefits could be much greater. Stavins argued that carbon taxes or cap-and-trade systems are the most effective solutions to reduce emissions.