Environment & Climate Change

18 Items

Arctic Innovation Lab participants meet with Kennedy School students following their presentations on climate-related ideas and solutions.

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Arctic Initiative Takes Innovation and Expertise to Reykjavík

| Fall/Winter 2018-2019

Twenty-four Harvard Kennedy School students recently returned from the Arctic Circle Assembly in Reykjavík—the world’s largest annual gathering on Arctic issues—where each presented her or his innovative and interdisciplinary solution to an Arctic challenge. These “Arctic Innovators” are part of Harvard Kennedy School’s Arctic Initiative, which is co-led at the Belfer Center by John P. Holdren, Henry Lee, and Halla Logadóttir. Focused on policy responses to the challenges posed by rapid climate change in the Arctic, the Initiative has recently secured new outside funding totaling $3 million to cover programs over the next three years.

Video - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Halla Hrund Logadóttir on Office Hours

| July 02, 2018

Halla Logadóttir, former director of the Iceland School of Energy at Reykjavík University and co-founder of the Belfer Center’s Arctic Initiative, speaks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about the future of the Arctic region, sustainability in Iceland, and how Icelanders get their names.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Halla Hrund Logadóttir on Office Hours Podcast

| July 02, 2018

Halla Logadóttir, former director of the Iceland School of Energy at Reykjavík University and co-founder of the Belfer Center’s Arctic Initiative, speaks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about the future of the Arctic region, sustainability in Iceland, and how Icelanders get their names.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

As Climate Change Upends the Arctic, ‘Innovators’ Seek Solutions

    Author:
  • Jacob Carozza
| Spring 2018

Across the Arctic, rapid climate change is taking its toll. Melting ice and sea level rise are threatening entire communities. Areas rich in oil and gas are opening up to exploration, but the economic benefits often do not reach Arctic populations. For many, life in the Arctic is becoming more difficult each day.

A view of Logadóttir’s family farm in Iceland. (Credit: Mats Wibe Lund)

Mats Wibe Lund

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Spotlight: Halla Hrund Logadóttir

| Spring 2018

For Halla Hrund Logadóttir, the challenges posed by rapid climate change in the Arctic truly hit home. Growing up on her grandparents’ sheep farm in Iceland, Logadóttir could see the crags of a massive glacier on the horizon. While sheep grazed on sloping volcanic fields of emerald green grass, she learned to drive tractors and fix engines. Today, she’s using that hands-on experience to protect the world’s most fragile ecosystem.

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Analysis & Opinions - Arctic Today

Frozen Superhighway: How Arctic Indigenous Organizations Can Embrace the Internet

    Author:
  • Vincent Lowney
| Feb. 16, 2018

The economic opportunities in the North are leading to greater investment in infrastructure. As part of this growth, internet connections are emerging in previously disconnected communities. This connectivity is not equally distributed nor is it a priority for all governments, but as internet connection becomes more and more central to the modern world, indigenous communities will be presented with increasing opportunities to use it for their benefit.

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Analysis & Opinions - Arctic Today

Could an Arctic Agreement Revolutionize Global Trade?

    Author:
  • Mehek Sethi
| Feb. 09, 2018

While traditional trade agreements tend to neglect environmental regulatory cooperation, an Arctic Free Trade Area, including all eight Arctic Council member countries (Canada, the Kingdom of Denmark — including Greenland and the Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States), could set a new and revolutionary precedent.