International Relations

88 Items

Nov. 23, 2016, a train returns from transporting ballast used in the construction of the Nairobi-Mombasa railway

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Discussion Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

African Regional Economic Integration

| Winter 2018

The power of Pan-Africanism as a guiding vision for the continent’s development is widely studied, mostly as an aspirational phenomenon. At worst, Pan-Africanism has often been seen as a poor imitation of American federalism or European integration. Both of these perceptions do not reflect the profound nature of the role that the ideology of Pan-Africanism played in shaping the continent’s economic transformation. 

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Blog Post - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Trade and Inequality Within Countries

| Jan. 05, 2018

Inequality has been on the rise within the United States and other advanced countries since the 1980s and especially since the turn of the century.  The possibility that trade is responsible for the widening gap between the rich and the rest of the population has of course become a major political preoccupation

Tokyo at night

Flickr / Agustin Rafael Reyes

Paper - London School of Economics

Global Review of Finance For Sustainable Urban Infrastructure

    Authors:
  • Graham Floater
  • Dan Dowling
  • Denise Chan
  • Matthew Ulterino
  • Tim McMinn
  • Ehtisham Ahmad
| December 2017

This paper is a background review representing part of the initial phase of the Financing the Urban Transition work program. The review builds on a growing body of research that highlights both the importance of national sustainable infrastructure and the need to develop more effective and efficient financing mechanisms for delivering compact, connected cities that meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. While progress has been made in both these areas over the last five years, there remains a policy gap between the international/national level and the municipal level.

Sample financial portfolio viewed on an iPad.

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Analysis & Opinions - VoxEU

Democratizing Finance: The Digital Wealth Management Revolution

| Nov. 11, 2017

Despite specialised press coverage, little is known about the potential wider socioeconomic implications of digital wealth management solutions. This column examines how ‘robo-advisors’ offer an opportunity to democratise finance and decrease wealth inequality. These algorithmic investment advisors stand to disrupt the wealth management sector through their ‘low-cost, accessible to most’ business models. However, the entrance of traditional wealth managers into the robo-advisor market could threaten this disruption.

A man is reflected in a glass as an electronic stock board shows the Hang Seng Index at a bank in Hong Kong, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. Most Asian stock markets fell Friday as investors turned cautious following new U.S. sanctions targeting North Korea and a China credit rating downgrade.

(AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Can Chinese banks identify North Korean sanctions evaders?

| Oct. 04, 2017

Last week, President Trump signed a new executive order that paves the way to impose sanctions against any foreign bank that conducts business with North Korea, going well beyond current UN financial sanctions. These so-called secondary sanctions, which are penalties applied to third-party foreign banks (i.e., not directly against North Korean entities), are particularly focused on Chinese banks.

The U.S. Federal Reserve Bank Building, home to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, is seen in Washington, Friday, April 25, 2014. Often referred to as “the Fed,” it is the nation’s central banking system and sets monetary policy for the United States. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Larry Summers on the future of banking

| May 02, 2017

"I guessed that 10 years from now, the odds that there would be a fintech company with the kind of $250 billion market cap that some big American banks have was about 25 percent. I did not expect that in the foreseeable future fintech would have the kind of existential impact on banks that Netflix has had on Blockbuster."

Trader Daniel Ryan works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. Stock indexes are barely budging in early trading on Wall Street as investors look over a large batch of earnings reports from U.S. companies. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The stock market has boomed under Trump. What happens next might scare you.

| Jan. 29, 2017

This week the "Trump Rally" continued as the Dow Jones Industrial Average crossed 20,000, and our president issued a celebratory. How much does this mean? To what extent is it a vindication of the economic policy approaches pursued by the new Administration? Will the post-election rally continue? 

President Donald Trump gestures towards GM CEO Mary Barra, right, before the start of a meeting with automobile leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. From left are, Vice President Mike Pence, left, and Matt Blunt, president of the American Automotive Policy Council and the former governor of Missouri. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

It’s time for business leaders to wake up about Trump

| Jan. 24, 2017

Do the financial cheerleaders for a business-leader-dominated administration approve of the emerging combination of weak dollar rhetoric from both the president and Treasury secretary nominee along with strong dollar policy?

If, as secretary nominee Mnuchin has just written to Congress and the president has asserted, the administration believes the dollar is too strong, why are all its policies calculated to raise the dollar: (i) very expansionary fiscal policy (ii) complaints about easy money (iii) measures like the border tax adjustment that discourage imports and encourage exports and (iv) measures to reduce capital outflows as American companies outsource? This is the least coherent dollar policy since the Carter administration.