International Security & Defense

831 Items

A Chinese soldier stands guard next to Tiananmen Square

AP/Louise Delmotte

Journal Article - Global Studies Quarterly

Two Paths: Why States Join or Avoid China's Belt and Road Initiative

    Authors:
  • M. Taylor Fravel
  • Raymond Wang
  • Nick Ackert
  • Sihao Huang
| 2023

Although China's motives for developing the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) have been well studied, scholars have yet to comprehensively examine why states seek to join the initiative. The authors fill this gap by examining how and why states join the BRI. Countries join by signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with China on cooperation under the BRI framework.

Donald Trump

AP/Charles Krupa

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Another Trump Presidency Won't Much Change U.S. Foreign Policy

| Jan. 22, 2024

Stephen Walt writes that the differences in foreign policy will be less significant than one may think. Consider how Trump and Biden would each likely deal with the three most important items on the current foreign-policy agenda: Ukraine, China, and the Middle East.

 A section of the cheering crowd at Buckingham Palace

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

A Practical Guide to Perpetual Peace

| Dec. 19, 2023

Stephen Walt advocates for world leaders (and publics) to start by taking realism's lessons more seriously and cast a more skeptical eye on any ideology that claims to have found the key to ending war forever. Because these proposals all require imposing political beliefs on others who may not want to accept them, they typically make the problem worse rather than better.

European Council President Charles Michel addresses the media

AP/Virginia Mayo

Analysis & Opinions - Wilson Center

Ukraine in Europe: One Hard-Earned Step Closer

| Dec. 15, 2023

Mariana Budjeryn writes: War never stops at the border, especially on a continent like Europe. The European Union absorbed millions of Ukrainian war refugees and poured billions of euros into Ukraine's defenses and economic survival. The war permanently reshaped Europe: its demographics, political economy, and energy architecture are shifting in ways that will have irreversible long-term consequences. All of this is because in a very real sense Ukraine already is inextricably woven into the fabric of Europe: Ukraine’s pain is Europe’s pain and Ukraine’s gain will inevitably be Europe's gain, too.

President Joe Biden greets China's President President Xi Jinping

Doug Mills/The New York Times via AP, Pool, File

Analysis & Opinions - Financial Times (London)

America Should Aim for Competitive Coexistence with China

| Nov. 16, 2023

Joseph Nye writes that Washington's strategy towards Beijing should be to avoid either a hot or cold war, co-operate when possible and marshal its assets to shape China's external behaviour. This can be done through deterrence and a strengthening of both alliances and international institutions.

Aerial view shows newly dug empty graves

AP/Alex Babenko

Analysis & Opinions - Just Security

The 'Murky' Morality of Opposition to US Support for Ukraine: A Response

| Oct. 10, 2023

Mariana Budjeryn responds to Stephen Walt's September 22, 2023, commentary, “The Morality of Ukraine’s War is Very Murky,” in Foreign Policy.  She argues that it is up to Ukrainians to determine when to end it and how to relate their costs to their stakes.

Houses are seen underwater and polluted by oil in a flooded neighborhood in Kherson, Ukraine

AP/Evgeniy Maloletka

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Morality of Ukraine's War Is Very Murky

| Sep. 22, 2023

Stephen Walt's analysis of the morality of the war in Ukraine includes the following reasoning: But I wish hardliners would acknowledge that their uncompromising approach to the war could do more harm to Ukraine in the long run. Not because that is what hardliners want, but because that is what their policy recommendations may produce.