International Security & Defense

504 Items

Dr. Cheddi Jagan, right, celebrates with his U.S. born wife, Janet, left

AP

Journal Article - Passport: The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Review

Intelligence, U.S. Foreign Relations, and Historical Amnesia

| April 2019

Calder Walton writes that the use and abuse of intelligence is one of the most contested and scrutinized subjects in contemporary news and current affairs. By contrast, for a student of history who is eager to understand the similarities and differences between clandestine operations today and those in the past, there are yawning gaps in the literature and the classroom when it comes to intelligence, U.S. foreign relations, and international relations. These gaps exist even in some of the latest and most authoritative publications, as well as the history classes of major U.S. universities.

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Announcement - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ernest May Fellow Calder Walton Co-edits Landmark History of Espionage

| Dec. 05, 2018

Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy Dr. Calder Walton and Christopher Andrew, Emeritus Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Cambridge are co-editing the three volume Cambridge History of Espionage and Intelligence, which has been commissioned by Cambridge University Press and will be available in print and digital formats. Publication is scheduled for 2022.

The left photo features Alexander Petrov, and the right photo features Ruslan Boshirov, two men that British prosecutors have charged with the nerve agent poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. On October 8, investigative group Bellingcat reported that Petrov is actually Alexander Mishkin, a doctor working for the Russian military intelligence unit known as GRU.

Uncredited

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

A Public Warning to Putin: Knock It Off

| Oct. 09, 2018

One of the most satisfying moments in any spy thriller is when the bad guy — the black-hat operative who has been killing and tormenting his adversaries — does something dumb and gets caught. That’s essentially what’s been happening recently with Russian President Vladimir Putin’s pet spy agency, the GRU.

Sovereign Venture Capitalism: At a Crossroad

StockSnap/Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - The Economist

Sovereign Venture Capitalism: At a Crossroad

| Oct. 03, 2018

What the Iron Man-like character is claiming for his futuristic automotive company is not unheard of. On a systemic basis, mammoth institutional investment—especially from sovereign wealth funds (SWFs)—is flowing into start-ups and technology-oriented publicly traded companies. In this case, Saudi billions would help Mr Musk escape the pressures of being publicly listed. SWFs have invested large sums into high-growth start-ups promising innovation and financial returns. In fact, just this month, Saudi’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) announced a US$1bn investment in Tesla’s rival, Lucid, and a US$2bn stake in Tesla. The rise in SWF balance sheets and activity is having ramifications on global efforts to be more Silicon Valley-like, and on Silicon Valley itself.