International Security & Defense

548 Items

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, July 4, 2017. 

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The Autocrat's Achilles' Heel

| Feb. 02, 2018

"There seem to be no effective checks to Putin and Xi’s growing ambitions. Both leaders, however, could be making a strategic error. They are staking their countries’ futures, and international trajectories, on one thing: themselves. Throughout their respective reigns, Putin and Xi have taken steps to consolidate their personal control on power. This may work as a stabilizing mechanism in the short term, but in the long term, can exacerbate inherent domestic tensions that could eventually undermine their rule."

Journal Article - Journal of Conflict Resolution

International Peacekeeping and Positive Peace: Evidence from Kosovo

| November 2017

To what extent can international peacekeeping promote micro-foundations for positive peace after violence? Drawing on macro-level peacekeeping theory, the authors' approach uses novel experimental methods to illustrate how monitoring and enforcement by a neutral third party could conceivably enhance prosocial behavior between rival groups in a tense, postconflict peacekeeping environment.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin

AP

Analysis & Opinions - World Politics Review

As Iranian Influence Grows in Syria, Little Is Quiet on Israel's Northern Front

| Oct. 27, 2017

"Israel has continually expressed its determination to prevent the violence in Syria from spilling over the border, but the new stage of the civil war presents new risks. Shells were fired from Syria into Israeli territory on two occasions in the last week. They may have been errant fire, or a Syrian test of Israeli resolve. Either way, Israel responded with pinpointed counterstrikes against the sources of fire, while destroying a Syrian missile battery that had fired on an Israeli reconnaissance flight over Lebanon. Together, these incidents may reflect a growing willingness on the part of the Assad regime to take risks, now that it is securely back in power."

Kurdish protest against ISIS

Alan Denney

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

How the U.S. Can Quell the Kurdish Crisis

| Oct. 04, 2017

More than 90 percent of Iraq's Kurds voted to declare independence last week, bringing tensions to an even higher boil across the Middle East. The regional governments that opposed the referendum -- Turkey, Iran and the Iraqi government in Baghdad -- are intent on punishing the Kurds, already beginning economic measures and even threatening a military response.

The U.S., which also vigorously opposed the referendum, must resist the urge to pile on. Rather, Washington should shift its policy away from combating a Kurdish challenge to the unity of Iraq to a more neutral, less outcome-oriented stance.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin

Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik

Analysis & Opinions - Real Clear Politics

Counterterrorism in a Time of Great Power Rivalry

| Oct. 02, 2017

Since 11 September 2001 the United States has been able to drive the global counterterrorism agenda as it saw necessary. Those days are over. The global environment has permanently shifted. The open rivalry with Moscow and growing competition with China are going to increase the potential costs on U.S. counterterrorism activity and outright restrain it in others.

President Donald J. Trump addresses the nation on the South Asia strategy during a press conference at Conmy Hall on Fort Myer, Va., Aug. 21, 2017. (DoD photo by Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith)

DoD photo/Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith

Analysis & Opinions - Just Security

Trump's War-More Risk Than Reward for US Military Involvement in Afghanistan

| Aug. 22, 2017

It is ironic that when President Trump finally made his first major foreign policy decision, he ran with the advice of his “cooler heads” — the Generals he admires — over his own instincts to cut U.S. losses and get out of this jungle. In extending U.S. involvement in Afghanistan for the narrower purpose of battling the Taliban, Al-Qaeda, ISIS and associated groups, every U.S. soldier killed and wounded in Afghanistan from this day forward becomes in effect a casualty of the scourge of terrorism the president is determined to thwart.

In this April 17, 2017, file photo, U.S. forces and Afghan security police are seen in Asad Khil near the site of a U.S. bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File)

AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Getting an Edge in the Long Afghan Struggle

| June 22, 2017

America’s leaders should not lose sight of why the U.S. went to, and has stayed in, Afghanistan: It is in our national interest to ensure that country is not once again a sanctuary for transnational extremists, as it was when the 9/11 attacks were planned there.

In this Thursday, June 21, 2007 file photo, an F-16 Falcon takes off from Balad Air Base, 50 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq. (AP Photo/ Maya Alleruzzo, File)

AP Photo/ Maya Alleruzzo, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Cipher Brief

U.S. Downing of Syrian Warplane: A “Canary in the Coal Mine”

| June 22, 2017

As U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) and Russia-backed Syrian government forces come ever closer to overlap in Raqqa Province and Deir al Zour, The Cipher Brief’s Leone Lakhani spoke with Admiral James ‘Sandy’ Winnefeld – former Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff – about what this means for U.S.-Russian relations in the Syrian conflict.