Science & Technology

12 Items

Earth at night, 2012. People around the world depend upon electric lighting. Generating electricity using increased amounts of non-fossil fuels is critical to slowing climate change.

USA.gov

Journal Article - Ecological Economics

Using Inclusive Wealth for Policy Evaluation: Application to Electricity Infrastructure Planning in Oil-Exporting Countries

| 2017

Decision-makers often seek to design policies that support sustainable development. Prospective evaluations of how effectively such policies are likely to meet sustainability goals have nonetheless remained relatively challenging. Evaluating policies against sustainability goals can be facilitated through the inclusive wealth framework, which characterizes development in terms of the value to society of its underlying capital assets, and defines development to be potentially sustainable if that value does not decline over time.

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News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Study Examines Water Used for Fuel Extraction, Power Generation

January 26, 2016

A new study co-authored by researchers at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, and the University of Calgary provides the first comprehensive representation of changing water consumption patterns associated with fuel extraction and power generation.

An oil pump jack in Santa Maria, California, a three-story humming contraption struck residents as a mere curiosity until someone uttered the petroleum industry's dirty word: fracking.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Discussion Paper

North American Oil and Gas Reserves: Prospects and Policy

| July 2012

Expanding estimates of North America’s supply of accessible shale gas, and more recently, shale oil, have been trumpeted in many circles as the most significant energy resource development since the oil boom in Texas in the late 1920s. How large are these resources? What challenges will need to be overcome if their potential is to be realized? How will they impact U.S. energy policy?

To address these questions, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and two of its programs ― the Environment and Natural Resources Program and the Geopolitics of Energy Project ― convened a group of experts from business, government, and academia on May 1, 2012, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The following report summarizes the major issues discussed at this workshop. Since the discussions were off-the-record, no comments are attributed to any individual. Rather, this report attempts to summarize the arguments on all sides of the issues.

Volkswagens Golf electric cars and Touareg hybrid cars pass by Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, 6 April 2011. Volkswagen China announced that the first demonstrative electric car motorcade of Volkswagen worldwide will be in Beijing.

AP Photo

Journal Article - Energy Policy

Oil Development in China: Current Status and Future Trends

    Authors:
  • Linwei Ma
  • Zheng Li
  • Pei Liu
| June 2012

This paper attempts to present a full picture of the current status and future trends of China's oil development through system analysis. The authors design three scenarios of China's oil demand in 2030 and analyze policy implications for oil conservation, automotive energy development, and energy security. From their analysis, they draw some conclusions for policy decisions, such as controlling total oil consumption to avoid energy security risks, enhancing oil conservation in all sectors with the emphasis on road transportation, and increasing investment in oil production and refining to secure oil supply and reduce emissions.

Press Release

Reducing Cars' and Trucks' Carbon Emissions Difficult but Feasible, New Study Finds

| Mar. 04, 2010

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A new study from current and former researchers at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs finds that reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation will be a much bigger challenge than conventional wisdom assumes — requiring substantially higher fuel prices combined with more stringent regulation.

Masses of cars are seen on a road in Beijing, China, July 17, 2008. As many as 5.5 million cars will be on Beijing city roads by 2015.

AP Photo

Journal Article - Energy Policy

China's Fuel Economy Standards for Passenger Vehicles: Rationale, Policy Process, and Impacts

| November 2009

"China issued its first Fuel Economy Standards (FES) for light-duty passenger vehicles (LDPV) in September 2004, and the first and second phases of the FES took effective in July 2005 and January 2008, respectively. The stringency of the Chinese FES ranks third globally, following the Japanese and European standards....The Chinese experience is highly relevant for countries that are also experiencing or anticipating rapid growth in personal vehicles, those wishing to moderate an increase in oil demand, or those desirous of vehicle technology upgrades."

Time to Act: Kelly Sims Gallagher, director of the Center’s Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, welcomes participants to the “Acting in Time on Energy Policy” conference.

Martha Stewart

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Experts Identify Most Urgent Energy Policy Needs at Acting in Time Conference

| Winter 2008-09

On September 18-19, the Belfer Center’s Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group hosted a major conference on U.S. energy policy. Under the auspices of the Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard, led by William Hogan and Louisa Lund, and with the cooperation of Harvard University Center for the Environment, ETIP brought together members of academia, research centers, government, business, and non-governmental organizations for intensive discussion on future energy policy directions for the United States. Click here for photos.