Science & Technology

90 Items

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Election Officials Discuss Midterm Interference and Security Plans for 2020

| Dec. 18, 2018

“It was too quiet.”

That was the sentiment expressed by a number of the 45 election officials from 23 states who gathered earlier this month at Harvard for a Belfer Center Defending Digital Democracy (D3P) Midterm After-Action Conference to discuss problems around their November midterm elections.  Most said they experienced significant but mostly unintended misinformation – and some disinformation – along with a number of other challenges to their electoral processes, but not the extensive foreign cyber and other attacks that took place during the 2016 presidential election.

The Palace of Nations

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Analysis & Opinions - Strategist

How Will New Cybersecurity Norms Develop?

| Mar. 12, 2018

Many observers have called for laws and norms to secure this new environment. But developing such standards in the cyber domain faces a number of difficult hurdles. Although Moore's law about the doubling of computing power every two years means that cyber time moves quickly, human habits, norms, and state practices change more slowly.

Analysis & Opinions - The Cipher Brief

The Making of a Cyber Diplomat

    Authors:
  • Michael Sulmeyer
  • Gabriella Roncone
| Aug. 23, 2017

Cyber diplomacy thus far has been a careful balance of promoting both the U.S.’s interests and values in cyberspace. Obvious as it may sound, we think that the next step for the Trump Administration should be to consider and then explain the interests and values it wants to pursue. Although anything is possible, they may well come out similar to past Republican and Democrat administrations. But now is the time to turn ambiguity into clarity and to ensure we continue to channel our considerable diplomatic heft towards the pursuit of core interests and values.

Paper - Cyber Security Project, Belfer Center

A Legislator's Guide to Reauthorizing Section 702

    Author:
  • Anne Boustead
| Aug. 20, 2017

Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act of 2008, a powerful surveillance tool that allows U.S. government agencies to spy on foreign persons to collect counter-terrorism intelligence, will expire on December 31, 2017 without Congressional reauthorization. This paper has two goals: to concisely describe how agencies obtain information under Section 702, and to provide guidance to legislators and their staffers by examining the core issues they will confront as they consider reauthorizing this legislation.