Science & Technology

11 Items

a camera monitor shows Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi speaking

AP/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Asia After Trump

| Apr. 09, 2018

The rise of China and the election of President Donald Trump have led many to believe that the American century is effectively over. But the United States still has important power advantages — both globally and in the Asia-Pacific region — that will last well beyond the next four or even eight years.

Natalie Jaresko at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Benn Craig

News

Natalie Jaresko dicusses her time as Finance Minister of Ukraine with Harvard's Future of Diplomacy Project

| Dec. 21, 2016

Natalie Jaresko (MPP ’89), former Finance Minister of Ukraine, returned to Harvard on October 31st, 2016 to take part in the Future of Diplomacy Project’s international speaker series. In a public seminar moderated by Faculty Director Nicholas Burns, Jaresko, who currently serves as chairwoman of the Aspen Institute Kyiv, reflected on her time in office from 2014 to 2016. In her two years in office, the Ukrainian government  had to contend with the Russian annexation of Crimea, a national debt crisis, widespread governmental corruption, and political instability.

British Prime Minister Theresa May and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte pose for the media ahead of their meeting in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.

(AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Theresa May’s Abbanomics and Brexit’s new class war

| October 10, 2016

“If you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.”

Those were the key words of a speech by Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain, at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham last week. My response — as a fully paid-up member of the rootless cosmopolitan class — was: Ooh la la!

Welcome to the new class war, Brexit edition.

On one side, the citizens of the world — the Weltbürger — who are only citizens in the sense that Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane was a citizen. We have at least two passports. We speak at least three languages. And we have at least four homes, not one of them in the town where we were born.

Dutch lawmaker Geert Wilders talks to reporters as he arrives at at Quicken Loans Arena before the start of the second day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016.

(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Putting the Populist Revolt in Its Place

| October 6, 2016

In many Western democracies, this is a year of revolt against elites. The success of the Brexit campaign in Britain, Donald Trump’s unexpected capture of the Republican Party in the United States, and populist parties’ success in Germany and elsewhere strike many as heralding the end of an era. As Financial Times columnist Philip Stephens put it, “the present global order – the liberal rules-based system established in 1945 and expanded after the end of the Cold War – is under unprecedented strain. Globalization is in retreat.”

In fact, it may be premature to draw such broad conclusions.

Some economists attribute the current surge of populism to the “hyper-globalization” of the 1990s, with liberalization of international financial flows and the creation of the World Trade Organization – and particularly China’s WTO accession in 2001 – receiving the most attention. According to one study, Chinese imports eliminated nearly one million US manufacturing jobs from 1999 to 2011; including suppliers and related industries brings the losses to 2.4 million.

Medical personnel from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work at their laboratory in Entebbe, outside of Kampala, Aug. 2, 2012. The CDC team leader in Uganda says the Ebola virus outbreak is now under control.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Ebola Outbreak is Quelled — This Time

| August 9, 2012

"Global public health efforts tend to be be focused on reproductive and family issues. But health programs are very much a part of our security — hard security — apparatus. Even if the Ebola virus never makes it to American shores, a large outbreak in one or two countries in Africa would eventually have ripple effects leading to destabilization of governments, concerns about the global economy, refugee crises, and the end of immigration access to the United States for those in the impacted countries."

Student Christopher Cano and other Dream Act supporters protesting former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney at the Republican presidential candidate debate site in Tampa, Fla., Jan. 23, 2012

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

The DREAM Act Struggles On, Nameless But Alive

| January 26, 2012

"Could the corporate appeal of the H-1B visa program be coupled with the idealism of the DREAM Act for an entirely different way of looking at immigration reform? The White House is content to leave the exact statutory proposal nameless as a nod to a potential compromise that may be more limited than the DREAM Act, but a step in the right direction."

In this Sept. 24, 2010, file photo the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepares for the Cyber Storm III exercise at its operations center in Arlington, Va.

AP Photo

Magazine Article - Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

The Future of Power

| Spring 2011

"The conventional wisdom among those who looked at the Middle East used to be that you had a choice either of supporting the autocrat or being stuck with the religious extremists. The extraordinary diffusion of information created in Egypt and other Middle Eastern countries reveals a strong middle that we weren't fully aware of. What is more, new technologies allow this new middle to coordinate in ways unseen before Twitter, Facebook, and so forth, and this could lead to a very different politics of the Middle East. This introduces a new complexity to our government's dealings with the region."

Activists of the anti globalization organization attac are dressed like wolves in sheep furs while protesting against the upcoming world financial summit with a poster "Wearing a sheep fur still does not change the system" in Vienna on Nov. 14,  2008.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Korea Times

Which Globalization Will Survive?

| April 13, 2009

"The world economy will shrink this year for the first time since 1945, and some economists worry that the current crisis could spell the beginning of the end of globalization....Globalization has several dimensions, and, though economists all too often portray it and the world economy as being one and the same, other forms of globalization also have significant effects — not all of them benign — on our daily lives."