62 Items

China's President Xi Jinping delivers a toast at a state dinner at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017 (Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP).

Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - New Statesman

The Chairman of Everything: Why Chinese President Xi Jinping Will Change History

| Dec. 04, 2017

Xi is now not only the most powerful leader of China since Mao. He is also the most ambitious leader of any country today. In the past five years, he has proved himself the most effective in advancing his nation’s position in the world. And among all of the competitors on the international stage, he is the most likely to leave a lasting mark on history.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, reacts as Chinese President Xi Jinping waves to business delegates during a business event at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday, November 9, 2017. Trump is on a five-country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - Politico

Will Trump and Xi ‘Solve’ North Korea?

| Nov. 08, 2017

The centerpiece of President Trump’s conversation with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Thursday will doubtless be North Korea. Before their first meeting in April, Trump’s message to Xi was unmistakable: You solve this problem, or I will, and you won’t like the way I do it. Then, just after he served Xi and his wife chocolate cake at Mar-a-Lago, Trump excused himself and went to an adjacent room to announce that the U.S. was launching 59 cruise missiles against Syria. Message: I’m serious.

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together at Mar-a-Lago on April 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The Atlantic

Can North Korea Drag the U.S. and China Into War?

| Sep. 11, 2017

Amid the exchange of threats between North Korea and the United States, ongoing North Korean nuclear and missile tests, and U.S. talk of “all options,” there is growing concern about the real possibility of war with North Korea. What many have not yet reckoned with is an even darker specter. Could events now cascading on the Korean Peninsula drag the U.S. and China into a great-power war?

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Analysis & Opinions - Lowy Institute for International Policy

China, America and the Thucydides Trap: An interview with Graham Allison

| Aug. 23, 2017

Graham Allison, Director of Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs from 1995 until July 2017, is a leading analyst of US national security and defence policy. His latest book, 'Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?', was published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in May 2017, and is the subject of this interview, conducted via email over the course of the last few weeks.

U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford, left, and Chinese Northern Theater Command Commander Gen. Song Puxuan, right, meet together at Northern Theater Command Army Force Haichung Camp in Haichung, China on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Playing Chicken With China

| Aug. 20, 2017

President Trump appears desperate, erratic and even irrational as he struggles to stop North Korea from developing nuclear weapons capable of reaching the U.S. mainland. If the president is to be believed, he stands ready to run any risk, pay any price and do whatever necessary to keep the U.S. safe. This includes launching a pre-emptive attack that risks dragging America and China into a second Korean War. To understand the method in what looks like madness, recall the Cold War strategy known as “nuclear chicken.”