Speakers: Meredith Crowley, Reader in International Economics, University of Cambridge; Gregory Shaffer, Chancellor's Professor, University of California, Irvine; Mark Wu, Vice Dean, Graduate Program and International Legal Studies and Henry Stimson Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Moderator: Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School

The existing global political-economic order has been ruptured by the rise of China, a broad backlash against globalization, uncertainties about the U.S. commitment to a rules-based system, and most recently, the Covid-19 pandemic. What form(s) might a future world order take, and what principles should guide efforts to construct it?

Arrangements designed to manage global trade and investment in new technologies will be a critical part of any future world order.  The participants in this online webinar will discuss and respond to a recent paper on the future world order by Dani Rodrik and Stephen Walt (available here) and consider whether the framework presented in the paper could be used to guide the future of trade relations with respect to new technologies. In particular, the discussion will address questions such as these:

1. Are there some minimal rules on which the United States, China, and other countries can agree to underpin trade and investment in new digital technologies?

2. What are the prospects for formal or informal agreements based on mutual adjustments, in which different states agree to restrict the use of certain policies — such as state support for firms or restrictions on domestic investments — in exchange for parallel concessions by others?

3. Where major economic powers are unable to reach agreements on global rules or mutual adjustments, can nations unilaterally pursue domestic national security or economic objectives in ways that do not produce unwarranted harms on other countries?

4. Specifically, what is the likelihood that Huawei and other similar areas of tension be addressed without escalation, through the approach outlined in the Rodrik-Walt paper or other approaches?

5. What are the respective roles of multilateral versus bilateral/regional approaches in dealing with international economic conflicts in the future?

Everyone is welcome to join us via Zoom! Register in advance for this meeting: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYld-2rrD8sHNCn-5Gk-s48kTqNV1MBF7Xp

For more information, email the International Security Program Assistant at susan_lynch@harvard.edu.

The existing global political-economic order has been ruptured by the rise of China, a broad backlash against globalization, uncertainties about the U.S. commitment to a rules-based system, and most recently, the Covid-19 pandemic. What form(s) might a future world order take, and what principles should guide efforts to construct it? The Future World Order event series will address these questions by examining individual topics ranging from traditional security issues such as arms control to newer, relevant issues such as digital trade. Professors Dani Rodrik and  Stephen M. Walt will moderate individual sessions.