Journal Article

Revisiting Hiroshima in Iran: What Americans Really Think about Using Nuclear Weapons and Killing Noncombatants

| Summer 2017

Abstract

Since the 1945 nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, have Americans developed moral taboos against using nuclear weapons and killing noncombatants? A recent survey experiment suggests not. When asked to consider U.S. use of nuclear weapons in a hypothetical war with Iran, a majority of Americans prioritized protecting U.S. troops and achieving American war aims, even when doing so would mean using nuclear weapons to kill millions of foreign civilians.

For more information on this publication: Belfer Communications Office
For Academic Citation:

Scott D. Sagan and Benjamin A. Valentino, "Revisiting Hiroshima in Iran: What Americans Really Think about Using Nuclear Weapons and Killing Noncombatants," International Security, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Summer 2017), pp. 41–79.

The Authors

Scott Sagan