Analysis & Opinions

6317 Items

How sovereign wealth funds are inflating the Silicon Valley bubble

Flickr/Steve Jurvetson

Analysis & Opinions - The Conversation

How Sovereign Wealth Funds Are Inflating the Silicon Valley Bubble

| Aug. 21, 2018

Elon Musk jolted markets and shareholders when he tweeted his intention to take his electric car company, Tesla, private. Saudi billions, he proposed, could help the company escape the pressures of being publicly listed. In a blog post, Musk said that “the Saudi Arabian sovereign wealth fund [had] approached [him] multiple times about taking Tesla private”.

John Breannan gives the keynote speech at a public event at the LBJ Presidential Library on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015

(LBJ Library Photo/Gabriel Cristóver Pérez)

Analysis & Opinions - Just Security

Why I Signed the Former CIA Officials’ Letter on Clearances: In Defense of Rule of Law

| Aug. 20, 2018

I count myself among the skeptics concerning John Brennan’s organizational changes at the CIA, but such concerns have no bearing on the revocation of his clearances of other prominent national security officials. I signed the letter by former CIA officials repudiating the president’s actions because I am convinced that our nation is in a crisis. 

Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin waves during a Davis Cup Final tennis match in Moscow. Yeltsin engineered the final collapse of the Soviet Union and pushed Russia to embrace democracy and a market economy as the country's first post-Communist president

(AP Photo/Misha Japaridze, File)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Trump Is Your Yeltsin

| Aug. 19, 2018
Russian security elites do not respect President Trump. Quite the opposite, those security elites see Trump as a liability for America, which they must exploit while they can, because, based on their own experience, they fully expect American conservative forces to replace Trump as soon as possible. Their assessment of our president influences the risks they are willing to take advancing Russian national interests in the face of American objections.

Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Democratic Revolution Party shows his election ink-stained thumb after casting his vote at a polling station in Mexico City on Sunday, July 1, 2012.

AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo

Analysis & Opinions - El Universal

Border Police, an Opportunity for AMLO

| Aug. 16, 2018

The security situation in Mexico remains poor, with the country experiencing renewed violence at unacceptable levels. 2017 was among the most violent in Mexico’s history, and the violence has continued through this year. The large-scale breakdown of law-and-order helped propel Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) to Mexico’s presidency. Although how precisely AMLO intends to restore public safety remains generally unclear, one early proposal is quite promising for both Mexico and the United States.

President Trump speaking about Iran at the White House in October 2017 (White House Photo).

White House Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Where Does Trump Get the Power to Reimpose Sanctions?

| Aug. 15, 2018

Last week, the Trump administration reimposed unilateral sanctions against Iran. This comes after the administration announced its intention to withdraw from the Iran deal in April, despite compelling reasons not to. Like most of America’s sanctions regimes, Trump’s order to reimpose sanctions rests on authority granted under a little-known and even less understood statute that gives the president sweeping authority to regulate certain aspects of international trade and commerce: the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

A cyber threat map adorns a wall of the Cyber Security Operations Center at AEP headquarters in Columbus, Ohio on Wednesday, May 20, 2015.

AP Photo/John Minchillo

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

Battlefield Internet: A Plan for Securing Cyberspace

| September/October 2018

The Internet has always been much more than a venue for conflict and competition; it is the backbone of global commerce and communication. That said, cyberspace is not, as is often thought, simply part of the global commons in the way that the air or the sea is. States assert jurisdiction over, and companies claim ownership of, the physical infrastructure that composes the Internet and the data that traverses it. States and companies built the Internet, and both are responsible for maintaining it. Actions taken in the public sector affect the private sector, and vice versa. In this way, the Internet has always been hybrid in nature. 

So, accordingly, is the real cyberwar threat.

President Donald J. Trump and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey at the United Nations General Assembly

The White House/Shealah Craighead

Analysis & Opinions - WNYC

Deteriorating US-Turkey Relations

| Aug. 14, 2018

Amanda Sloat, Robert Bosch senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, and Nahal Toosi foreign affairs correspondent at Politico, discuss how tensions have been simmering between the U.S. and Turkey, and how Turkey's refusal to release an American pastor hasn't helped. They also discuss the Trump administration's new sanctions and tariffs on Turkey, and why the deteriorating relationship is a problem.

People on paddleboats in Gorky Park in Moscow. July 12, 2018 (Marco Verch/Flickr).

Marco Verch/Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - The Hill

In Gorky Park, With Nuclear Worries

| Aug. 13, 2018

Today, both Russia and the United States are modernizing their nuclear forces to keep these threats robust for decades to come — though their forces’ total numbers are limited by treaties (thank goodness). The U.S. program is expected to cost $1.2 trillion over 30 years, and the Trump administration has added new, smaller nuclear weapons that critics warn might seem more usable should war come. Russia’s program includes entirely new types of strategic weapons, from an intercontinental torpedo designed to blow up U.S. coastal cities to a nuclear-powered and nuclear-armed cruise missile.